URBAN HISTORY REVIEW/
REVUE D'HISTOIRE URBAINE
UHR Cover

Vol. 42, No. 2 (2014)
Publication Date: 2014-06-23
Number of articles: 12

Articles

Pages 5-7
Emotions and City Life - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Nicolas Kenny

Articles

Pages 8-17
An Alarming Lack of Feeling: Urban Travel, Emotions, and British National Character in Post-Revolutionary Paris - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Victoria Thompson

Abstract

This article analyzes British narratives of voyages made to Paris during three periods: the Peace of Amiens (March 1802 to May 1803), the first Restoration (April 1814 to May 1815), and in the first few years of the second Restoration (June 1815 to ca. 1820). These accounts reveal a consistent use of strong and distressing expressions of emotion when describing locations in the city associated with the events of the French Revolution. An analysis of these “emotional landmarks” allows us to understand the role of trauma in unsettling distinctions between the British and French in the aftermath of the Revolution. It also demonstrates that travel writers participated in an emotional community consistent with the nation, one that used these emotional landmarks to establish a new distinction between the two national characters based on emotion.

Articles

Pages 18-28
The Everyday Usage of City-Centre Streets: Urban Behaviour in Provincial Britain ca. 1930–1970 - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Lucy Faire; Denise McHugh

Abstract

This article examines the user experience in the city-centre street space, focusing on three main themes: space usage; the behaviour of users and interventions to direct behaviour by urban authorities; and the sensory and emotional experiences of being on the street. The emphasis is on people’s interaction with the city centre and their perceptions of it. These interactions generated multi-dimensional perspectives linked to individual socio-demographic characteristics producing place-specific experiences. The article uses film, photography and testimony to provide insights into street usage and, while acknowledging that the retail function of the city centre was fundamental, argues that this space generated wider experiences beyond the acquisition of goods and services in commercial transactions. The article concludes that the user experience, behaviour and relationship with the city-centre street are as important to understanding urban function as capital investment and city planning.

Articles

Pages 29-43
Sex, Intimacy, and Desire among Men of Chinese Heritage and Women of Non-Asian Heritage in Toronto, 1910–1950 - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Elise Chenier

Abstract

Because few women of Chinese heritage came to Canada, Chinese migrant communities before 1950 are described as “bachelor societies.” Sojourners’ own ambition to return home with more wealth, the imposition of ever-increasing head taxes on migrants from China, the 1923 Chinese Exclusion Act, and deeply entrenched racism toward people of Chinese heritage meant that the vast majority were doomed to live their lives without the emotional, material, or domestic support or companionship provided by wives and children. They were de facto bachelors, if not bachelors in fact. New research, however, shows that since the 1910s young men of Chinese heritage carved out spaces for themselves in Toronto’s urban sexual culture, and young white women a space for themselves in Toronto’s Chinatown. During the first half of the twentieth century, many men of Chinese heritage enjoyed sex, companionship, love, and family life. Perhaps as many as a third were married to or lived common-law with women of white heritage, and many more frequently engaged in sexual and intimate relationships with sex workers they sometimes sought as long-term companions. The evidence presented here challenges the current perception that “Chinese bachelors” lived sexless, loveless lives. These relationships were not without controversy, of course, but many people within the community accepted them, and women of white heritage, including sex workers, were integrated into the community in diverse ways.

Articles

Pages 44-58
The Role of Emotions in Protests against Modernist Urban Redevelopment in Perth and Halifax - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Jenny Gregory; Jill Grant

Abstract

In the 1950s and 1960s modernist town planning reordered countless cities through urban renewal and freeway-building projects. Applying rational planning expertise generated emotional responses that often lingered long after redevelopment occurred. This article considers the emotional response to urban renewal in two cities advised by the British town planner Gordon Stephenson. In Perth, Australia, Stephenson was amongst a group of experts who planned a freeway that obliterated part of the valued river environment and threatened a historic structure. In Halifax, Stephenson prepared the initial scientific study used to justify dismantling part of the downtown and a historic black community on the urban fringe. While the Perth case generated an explosion of emotional intensity that failed to prevent environmental despoliation but saved some heritage assets, the Halifax example initiated a lingering emotional dispute involving allegations of neglect and racism. Comparing cases resulting from the activities of a noted practitioner illustrates differing emotional trajectories produced in the wake of the modernist planning project.

In Memoriam

Pages 61-61
Jean-Pierre Collin (1947-2013) - PDF through Erudit
Author(s):

Book Reviews

Pages 63-64
Joanne M. Ferraro, Venice. History of the Floating City (New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012), 300 p. - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Shawn McCutcheon
Pages 64-65
David Garrioch, La fabrique du Paris révolutionnaire (Paris : La Découverte, 2013), 440 p. - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Sophie Abdela
Pages 65-66
Pierre-Mathieu Le Bel, Montréal et la métropolisation : Une géographie romanesque (Montréal : Éditions Triptyque, 2012), 212 p. - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Olivier Roy-Baillargeon
Pages 66-67
Frank Mackey, L’esclavage et les Noirs à Montréal, 1760-1840 (Montréal : Hurtibise, 2013), 672 p. - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Philippe Couture
Pages 67-68
Cédric Quertier, Roxane Chilà et Nicolas Pluchot (dir.), « Arriver » en ville. Les migrants en milieu urbain au Moyen Âge (Paris : Publications de la Sorbonne, 2013), 329 p. - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Lucie Laumonier
Pages 68-69
Habib Saidi et Sylvie Sagnes (dir.), Capitales et patrimoines à l’heure de la globalisation / Capital Cities and Heritage in the Globalization Era (Québec : Presses de l’Université Laval, 2012), 426 p. - PDF through Erudit
Author(s): Mathieu Dormaels
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